Educational Pack for Patients

Human Paratuberculosis Foundation has created an information pack designed with patients in mind. This downloadable pack, containing links to the latest research and resources on MAP science, can be printed or sent in electronic format. Presented in a brief, easy to read format, it provides an introduction to MAP in Crohn’s and other diseases, discusses detection rates, and sets out therapeutic options including clinical trials. A full page of additional resources follows, concluding with a short synopsis about the Human Para organization. This can be used to help you prepare to get the most out of your next visit with your healthcare professional. Understanding your condition and the latest research can increase your chances of improving and maintaining your health.

Request for Research Proposals

Human Paratuberculosis Foundation is pleased to announce that it is seeking research proposals from qualified applicants that will advance our knowledge about the role that Mycobacterium avium spp. paratuberculosis (MAP) plays in human disease. MAP has been detected in significantly higher numbers in patients with Crohn’s disease, Type 1 Diabetes, Multiple Sclerosis, Sarcoidosis, Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis and Psoriasis, and emerging research indicates that MAP may be involved in other conditions such as Parkinson’s disease, Blau Syndrome, Rheumatoid Arthritis and Lupus. It has been shown that patients with these conditions have genetic vulnerabilities which may hinder the immune system’s ability to correctly recognize pathogens, predisposing them to bacteria such as MAP.

Human Para now seeks to sponsor innovative research projects which will add to our understanding of MAP’s role in human disease. For further details and instructions on how to submit a proposal, please see the Application Instructions.

Dr. C. Thomas Dow | All Roads Lead from Crohn’s

“All roads lead to Rome” is the old axiom that described the central place the city of Rome played in its millennial world empire.  All roads lead from Crohn’s – this narrative discusses human diseases associated with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) other than Crohn’s disease, including Blau syndrome, Type I diabetes, sarcoidosis, lupus and Parkinson’s disease. For our purposes these roads are trails; genetic trails.

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The MAP Gap Newsletter | July 2017

Human Paratuberculosis Foundation is dedicated to providing the most up-to-date information in our field to assist patients around the world in making informed decisions about their treatment. We are grateful for the support of this community and look forward to taking this journey together.

Read all the latest news and research about Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and the treatment of Crohn’s and other diseases using Anti-MAP therapy. Enjoy!

Read the Newsletter

The MAP Gap Newsletter | April 2017

Human Paratuberculosis Foundation is dedicated to providing the most up-to-date information in our field to assist patients around the world in making informed decisions about their treatment. We are grateful for the support of this community and look forward to taking this journey together.

Read all the latest news and research about Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and the treatment of Crohn’s and other diseases using AMAT therapy. Enjoy!

Read the Newsletter

The Light at the End of the Tunnel

On my way home from the 2017 MAP Conference in Philadelphia, I had to drive through a tunnel which ran underneath a mountain. Tunnels have always made me a little nervous due the confinement, but I relaxed as I saw daylight coming from a small hole on the other side. As I focused on getting to the light, it occurred to me that this tunnel was a great representation of my journey with Crohn’s disease. For so many years I moved forward through life in the confinement of disease. Darkness was my companion, and I felt alone and different from those around me. But as my body healed on antibiotic therapy, I came back into the light of living a full and joyful life free of chronic disease.

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Grow Your Own Doctor

The following article was provided to Human Paratuberculosis Foundation by Dr. Judith Lipton. It was written in May 2015, but still remains relevant today. It is an excellent overview of MAP, and provides practical advice for patients who want to convince their doctor to treat their MAP infection.  HPF is grateful to Dr. Lipton for her contributions to the field and for providing this helpful article.

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UPDATE: 2017 MAP Conference

UPDATE: On March 24-25, 2017, MAP researchers and doctors from around the world will gather in Philadelphia, PA to share presentations and discuss how best to advance MAP science. Read the latest update about the Goals of the meeting, Discussion Topics, and Presenters list. Additionally, the latest sponsorship details are announced.

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Machines: The Microbiome Part II

There are at least two ways that bacteria may play a role in inflammatory bowel disease. The top of the Hit Parade at present is the gut microbiome. Researchers, by using complex new technologies, can take a virtual snapshot of the bacterial DNA in the gut of the IBD patient (and in the normal patient, of course). Successful snapshots end up as publications if they demonstrate a difference in the gut microbiome between these two groups. If the IBD patient shows an abundance of a particular organism when it is not apparent in the control group, then this may indicate the presence of an organism capable of triggering an inflammatory reaction in the gut of the patient.

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John Aitken | The Microbiome Part I: Islands

New Zealand is a collection of three islands. Life on an island is sustained by a complex infrastructure. Interdependence is the glue that results in sustainability. Sustainability, in turn, is ensured if the needs of both the population and the environment are addressed and met. The goal is harmony. Socially, islands resemble huge organisms; isolated yet functioning in a collective synchronicity with each of their parts. The organic model is not new – a group of organisms working together to the benefit of society. Ants build anthills, bees build beehives, people build complex societies.

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